18 May
2010
Posted in: Blog
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Aww come on… it’s just POLE DANCING!

Recently “crowned” Miss USA Rima Fakih from Michigan is embroiled in a mini-scandal, as pictures of her pole dancing at a Detroit “gentleman’s club” emerged shortly after winning the pageant.

In this day and age, when pole dancing is offered at “fitness centers” for women (and certainly some men) to keep in shape, this story is hardly that surprising.  What is slightly more surprising is how mainstream journalism treats the subject.  Writing on MSNBC.com, Mike Celizic seems baffled that anybody might view this behavior as less than acceptable for a national beauty queen:

They show Fakih doing a playful grind with her back to a stripper’s pole and her hands over her head. She’s dressed in a blue tank top with a relatively high neckline, red shorts and high heels. She did not remove any clothing at the women-only event; in fact, she barely shows her midriff, let alone anything else.

Isn’t it supposed to be at least SOMEWHAT wholesome?
Between this and the pinup-like photo shoot which dominated every show on television for a week, I think it’s safe to say that the Miss USA competition will be R-rated within a few years.
We’re just going to shrug off a pole dancing, quasi-ambassador for the USA because of her “relatively high neckline” and “barely” shown midriff?
That’s not the point!  She was dancing on a stripper pole!  Like, you know, STRIPPERS do!
Not the most important story, certainly.  There are a lot of bigger things going on in the world.  But this says something of our times, and how it’s nearly impossible to offend, much less surprise, the public.
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